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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
and nancy cordes. elaine quijano on the family heartbreak after russia's president bans all adoptions to americans. >> we ask president putin, please, can he set an alternate means but don't let me children suffer. >> glor: he met saddam hussein and made it look easy. david martin on the death of general norman schwarzkopf and what the world did not know about him. and "on the road" with steve hartman as a man tries to save his wife of 56 years. an unusual request that gets a surprising response. >> got two of them and i only need one. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> glor: good evening, scott is off tonight. i'm jeff glor. it is the end of a holiday week, but it would appear congress is just getting started. tonight, the president said he is mottestly optimistic about a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, which would mean avoiding automatic tax increases and spending cuts come, you know, 1. the president spoke to the nation this evening after an hour-long meeting with congressional leaders at the white house. democrat and republican leaders
to be retaliation for a new u.s. law that targets human rights abuses in russia. in the past two decades, more , mo 60,000 russian children have been given new homes inside the u.s. it elaine quijano met one family whose adoption is now on hold. >> look at this. look. >> reporter: two years ago kim and robert summers decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. enen you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? k i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little ginger boy, and i fell in love with him. >> reporter: the summers began filling their new jersey home with baby clothes, a crib, and even a stroller. they traveled to his orphanage in russia twice to bond with him. >> say, hi, daddy. >> reporter: you've given him a name. >> yes. preston mackey summers. he's a wonderful young boy who needs love and attention. >> reporter: like 1,500 other american families, the summers torry that the law banning opericans from adopting russian thedren could prevent them from bringing
of his few remaining allies, russia. >> pelley: david, thank you. the assad dictatorship has ruled syria for more than 40 years. the syrian people rebelled last year and it's been open warfare ever since. it's extremely hazardous for reporters to get into the war zone, but elizabeth palmer managed to reach a neighborhood under siege on the outskirts of the capital city, damascus. >> reporter: it's 6:00 p.m. the heavy shelling doesn't usually start until 9:00, so it's safe to go for a tour of this wrecked and virtually deserted neighborhood. this was one of the first neighborhoods to rise up against president bashar al-assad and for almost two years it's been punished. now 80% of the residents have been driven out. our guide was 21-year-old sara. the few people who remain here are too poor to leave or, like sara, too committed to the anti- regime fight. you're among the 20% who stayed. why? better to live here and die with dignity than go to a refugee camp? >> yes, die and we will be proud. >> reporter: at home, most days there is enough to eat for three generations of this family. but on
have been killed, mostly civilians. one reason assad has held on-- he's had the support of russia, but that may be changing. in ireland today, secretary of cline hillary clinton, met with the russian foreign minister. it happened at a meeting of the coganization for security and cooperation in europe, known as the o.s.c.e., and margaret brennan is covering for us tonight. margaret. >> reporter: well, scott, officials familiar with those talks say the russians now think that bashar al-assad may not survive the war, and they want to have influence in syria if his regime falls, or if he loses control of the chemical weapons inside of his country. u.s. officials are particularly concerned that those weapons dould fall into the hands of an al qaeda affiliate active within syria. r: pelley: so what's coming next? >> reporter: well, it's a start to a new round of diplomacy. the russians have refused to meet for months, but this is not nabreakthrough. the russians are signaling they're willing to help with the political transition, but they are still officially supporting haad. secretary
and president bashar al-assad could lose. russia even talked about evacuating its citizens. the war started nearly two years ago as a popular uprising. 40,000 people have died. in afghanistan, an american soldier and two afghans were killed by a car bomb today. it happened near the u.s. airbase at kandahar a few hours after defense secretary leon panetta left there to meet with afghan president karzai. taliban attacks have grown more frequent, causing a sharp rise in civilian casualties. clarissa ward found a place where many of those lives are saved or lost. >> reporter: every patient who arrives here is a casualty of war. this nonprofit trauma hospital goes by one name: emergency. it offers free treatment to the bruised and bloodied victims of this conflict. regardless of whether they're taliban or what their political affiliations are? >> of course. otherwise, you're not a doctor anymore; then are you a judge. >> reporter: dr. gino strada is the chain-smoking italian cardiologist who founded emergency in 1999. he told us he has seen a dramatic shift in the types of injuries he treats-- f
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)